Ludomedia #59

Ludomedia

Lesens-, hörens- und sehenswerte Fundstücke aus der Welt der Spiele.


Brandon Rym DeCoster & Scott Rubin: Nostalgia vs Game Design

  • “You really have to distill games down to very fundamental components […] to be able to understand what it is about a game that you liked that was fun, that made the game work. […] Kind of like when you make moonshine, some of the stuff that comes out of that still is super poisonous.”

Josh Bycer: The Game Design Trap of the “Zelda Rogue-Like”

  • “The beauty of Zelda’s formula was that the dungeons and points of interest always build on top of the previous. […] The point of a good rogue-like is never about getting to the end, but all the varying ways the middle can turn out differently.”

Keith Burgun: Clockwork Game Design Podcast Episode #52

  • “This is what’s so bad about non-variable match lengths: When you know where the end is coming, that tells you where to invest and where to start cashing out. […] If you look at a game that has a variable match length, you can get all kinds of different arrangements in terms of the strategy space.”

Mark Brown: Should Roguelikes Have Persistent Upgrades?

  • “The random levels mean you can’t rely on memorizing level layouts and permadeath means you can’t rely on accumulating power over time. […] I would argue that persistent upgrades go against that ideal and can minimize the role of player skill, putting much more emphasis on simply how long you’ve been playing the game.”

Raph Koster: What drives retention

  • “Once you have retention, you can worry about how to make money. […] Again, it doesn’t imply a particular business model: a service-based game is not a dirty word, doesn’t mandate constant moneygrubbing, doesn’t mean it has to be free to play. It just means that you the developer and you the player are in it for the long haul.”

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